Archive for October 2011

Podcast No. 72 Posted 10/24/2011   Leave a comment

Podcast No. 72 Posted 10/24/2011

Download Directly or Listen via CyBeRev at:

http://www.cyberev.org/rss/podcasts/podcast.xml

Music  – “Earthseed” fades out, as the voice recording begins.

TITLE:  Truths of Terasem – The How of Terasem 6.1 – 6.1.6

SUB TITLE:  Safe Nanotechnology and the Ethics to Achieve It

SUMMARY:  The development of replicator nanotechnology carries with it great risks and dangers, but they cannot be escaped by withdrawal or blindly counting on good luck.  An ethical framework must be erected and firmly guide what will happen; that starts one person at a time, one group at a time, one group of groups at a time, and so on outward until an airtight protective shield exists.

 

(Fred)  Hi, we’re Fred & Linda Chamberlain, with podcast 72 on the Truths of Terasem.  This week we begin the final precept section of the Truths of Terasem, “How?” does Terasem work?

(Linda)  Last week we looked at the need for absolute incorruptibility.  How do we accomplish that?  How do we overturn our evolutionary baggage, our  urges to compete, destroy and dominate?

(Fred) One person at a time, at first.  We start with ourselves.  That’s what the rituals, yoga, etc. are all about; giving us a tangible means of dealing with those evolutionary impulses, helping us leave behind the negative traits of unbridled competition and dominance, and learn to become the cooperative and incorruptible people so necessary for our long term survival, both as a species and as individuals.

(Linda)  We’ll talk more about rituals and yoga in upcoming podcasts, in a couple of weeks.  For today’s podcast, we’re going to focus primarily on Geoethical Nanotechnology.  We’ve touched on it often, but this podcast really digs into defining it and expanding on why it is so crucial if we are serious about catching that gold ring: joyful immortality.

(Fred)  I can’t think of anything more important!  Let’s go for it!  This precept, the “How of Terasem”,  starts with the overview statement:  “Terasem organizes collective consciousness via rituals and programs to implement geoethical nanotechnology everywhere.” That’s like saying we’re going to get a group together, fix where we’re going firmly in our minds in an organized way, and then remanufacture the universe.

(Linda) And, in a nutshell, that’s the big picture.  Think of the term “collective consciousness” as meaning a network of minds.  Think of “rituals” as a way of reaffirming the principles we’ve agreed upon.  The word “programs” means methodologies like yoga, to help us open our own minds and grow as individuals.

(Fred) And, the phrase “implementing geoethical nanotechnology everywhere” means not only that we develop full replicator technology here on Earth together with global ethics that allow all people everywhere to benefit from those technologies while at the same time preventing the possibility of destroying ourselves in the process, but further that we set out to do whatever’s necessary to help others we encounter survive also, in the same way, as we expand outward into the universe.

(Linda) Let’s look at the first expansion.  6.1 tells us: “Geoethical nanotechnology is a necessary and sufficient process for achieving diversity, unity and joyful immortality.  Lest any of our listeners are not familiar with the awesome promise of nanotechnology, here’s how the cover of Eric Drexler’s book, Engines of Creation capsulizes it:

“Mankind is on the threshold of the greatest innovation in the history of science and technology; the ability to build molecules atom by atom.  These molecular building blocks can then be arranged in any combination of patterns to produce every conceivable substance or device.  This new technology—called nanotechnology—will also enable scientists to repair damaged human cells.

“The possibilities thus appear limitless in prolonging human life, eradicating disease, and eliminating shortages of natural resources.  But there is also a darker side.  What of the horrifying new weapons that could result?  What are the human implications of nanotechnology?  What are the dangers?”

(Fred)  And I really like this quote by Marvin Minsky, from the Foreword he wrote for Drexler’s book:

“K. Eric Drexler’s Engines of Creation is an enormously original book about the consequences of new technologies.  It is ambitious and imaginative and, best of all, the thinking is technically sound…Engines of Creation is the best attempt so far to prepare us to think of what we might become, should we persist in making new technologies.”

(Linda) Next week we’ll focus on the dangers we face as we develop the most powerful technologies ever seen by humanity.  In this podcast, however, we focus primarily on the advantages.

(Fred)  So, assuming at least for this week, that we will be able to develop nanotechnology and other powerful technologies, 6.1 tells us that our goals of diversity, unity and joyful immortality will be accomplished through ethics and technology.

(Linda) The first element of this expansion, 6.1.1 states: “Joyful immortality arises because Geoethics enables everyone to pursue unlimited happiness via personal mutually respectful growth.”  This is, of course, an affirmation of the outcome of the successful development of geoethics.  The most fundamental concept implied by the word “geoethics” is that it is applied across all boundaries, whether physical or otherwise.  There are no caste barricades of any kind.  Geoethics implies the protection of the rights of everyone, everywhere.

(Fred)  In one sense this is an affirmation of a general sort, but the words “personal mutually respectful growth” puts it in one-on-one or person-to-person terms.  “Personal growth” and pursuit of “unlimited happiness” paints a picture of unbounded individuality, but the words “mutually respectful” and that beautiful term “Geoethics” suggest that no one may interfere with another without consent.  Period.

(Linda)  And that is so important.  Remember that even the American Revolution was only fought over the rights of educated, white, male, landowners.  Women and slaves were not considered privy to those rights.  It was a step forward in the evolution of human rights, but it was not geoethics in any way.

(Fred) 6.1.2 is very specific in how this needs to be implemented:  “Operating under Geoethics means obtaining consent from affected others, always reducing unfairness and independently ensuring compliance.” Events will unfold in such a way that without adjustments, unfairness will exist.  Differences in viewpoint between individuals guarantee that there will almost never be agreement at the outset of what is “fair”.

(Linda)  Make no mistake. True, universal, geoethics will not be easy to accomplish.  But that is why we need to work with all our intelligence and all our might to bring it about.

(Fred)  Right!  Even Martin Nowak, in his book SuperCooperators, makes this clear:

“There is always antagonism and rivalry…Where there is cooperation, there is also the danger of exploitation.  Defectors loom in the dark.  Ready to strike.  Waiting for the right opportunity to pounce and take advantage.  Cooperation comes and goes, waxes and wanes.  It has to be reborn in endless cycles”.

(Linda) It is far less than a perfect world, now, but it is far better than in the days when human slavery was as common as buying and selling cars, and the immobility of people based on birth or class differences inescapably bound them to limited opportunities within society.  So, the outlook is that it can be far more perfect than today, and yet still have room for improvement.

(Fred) Considering the expected pace of life post-Singularity, no time can be wasted in reducing the unfairness that remains as rapidly as possible. Settling disputes over fairness, when they arise, will be of critical importance, to preserve unity while seeking even higher levels of harmony within the Collective Consciousness that will constitute our future society.

(Linda) “Independently ensuring compliance” is not defined in detail in 6.1.2, so let’s pause a moment to consider this.  In our current capitalistic culture, “buyer beware” is a generally accepted rule of interaction.  Our competitive nature gloats when we get the best of the exchange.  But for true fairness to best be supported, both parties contracting for an exchange of values should seek the best outcome not only for themselves, but for the other party as well.  Win-win should always be the modus operendi.

(Fred)  It might also mean not being dependent on government regulators or enforcers, should misunderstandings or disputes arise, but rather taking action based on the observations of the independent individuals who are involved to seek redress of grievances by agreed upon arbitration, applying appropriate assessments of damages upon those who failed to carry agreed upon insurance, and in other ways not relying solely on bureaucracies to assure “fairness”.

(Linda) 6.1.3 says: “You must obtain consent if your actions are likely to meaningfully affect another conscious being.”  Remembering that Terasem’s definition of consciousness means possessing both empathy and a firm commitment to ethics that make sense to all concerned, this is an obvious part of the fairness issue in the previous element.  Not always easy.  But never to be abandoned for greed or impatience.

(Fred) In 6.1.4 we find, “Fairness favors consent, so shape actions to help most those with the greatest disadvantages.”  If the changes you are bringing about in the world are going to impact others, then the idea is to preplan to minimize the impacts on those who would be most disadvantaged by those changes.

A possible example of this might be to look at the early stages of the industrial revolution, where textile factories were going to replace home-industry, where entire lives were devoted to weaving and sewing.  Those families with the strongest traditions of those trades might have been the best prospects for offering employment to, and cultivating as supervisors and managers. One could apply the same approach to the rapidly changing world today.  It is along these lines that foresight in the event of change could be important in seeking optimum outcomes, and mutual consent to the end of maximum fairness should be agreed upon as a guiding principle.

(Linda)  I think everyone is familiar with the hostile take-over scenario so prevalent in our capitalistic culture; where companies are gutted for the profit of a few, while the business owner and employees are helpless to defend their own interests.  This kind of tragedy could never take place in a society where consent is sought by both parties, rather than dog eat dog.

(Fred) 6.1.5 states that: “Umpires are needed because non-compliance with agreements breeds anger.”  It’s important to acknowledge that moving toward the kind of cooperative society we envision, will be challenging.  Again, Martin Nowak in SuperCooperators says this very well:

“Even though we are extraordinary cooperators, human society has been—and always will be—riven with conflict…Many problems that challenge us today can be traced back to a profound tension between what is good and desirable for society as a whole and what is good and desirable for an individual.”

(Linda) Until we leave our biology behind, we will be hindered by two primary factors.  First, we will continue to have slow computing speeds for sifting through the tangles of complications that confront us, as that quote by Martin Nowak so aptly describes.  Compound that with the biological chemistry of our emotions, the inheritance of our DNA, and you have two very frustrating reasons why conflict will be with us for as long as we are the mercy of our biological capabilities.

(Fred) Finally, in 6.1.6, we find, “Love how geoethical nanotechnology replaces entropy with order by converting spacetime into information for beneficent control.”  This looks like the solution to the dilemma you just outlined, Linda, about how our biology is getting in our way.

(Linda) Right!  Spacetime describes the dimensionality of the universe.  We measure how things are related in terms of basic physics by these four parameters (three dimensions of space and one of time).  But, as life arises and becomes sentient, and begins to restructure the material universe in the form of consciousness on many different substrates, those dimensions are not sufficient anymore to describe what is going on.

(Fred)  Or, you could rephrase that simply by saying that as we transcend biology, the combination of technology and geoethics will make the Terasem goals reachable.

(Linda)  Or, we could say we have come full circle and that 6.1.6 is restating what 6.1 said to begin with: “Geoethical nanotechnology is a necessary and sufficient process for achieving diversity, unity and joyful immortality.”

(Fred)  Next week, we’re going to look at Geoethical Nanotechnology again, but with our focus on the development of replicator nanotechnology itself.  This will touch on the dangers, the ways of auditing to ensure against them, independent assurance of compliance, the benefits of passing the Singularity safely, and a comparison of how replicator nanotechnology is almost like a totally necessary “nourishment” we need to expand into the universe.

(Linda)  We invite all listeners to join Terasem and help us build a safe, ethical, positive outcome of the post-Singularity world we will inhabit in cyberspace.  It’s easy and costs nothing, as explained at terasemfaith.net. You can review all of the Truths of Terasem online at terasemweb.org or terasemfaith.net.

(Fred)  Start building your own mindfiles right away, through either CyBeRev.org or LifeNaut.com.  You can create your personal history, your autobiography, and upload it to CyBeRev.org by using the LifePact interview form.  Go to terasemfaith.net and then to Mindfile Building, about half way down the page.  There are no fees for building or storing your mindfile.

(Linda) If you want to create a BioFile by preserving your DNA, you can do that too, very inexpensively at LifeNaut.com.  And if you want to preserve your brain or your whole body through cryostasis, check out both alcor.org and cryonics.org.

(Fred)  For those of you who love games, Mike Clancy, at Terasem, has created the new mindfile building game for the Android.  It’s like a maze.  It’s very fast paced and addictive.  Check it out on PersonalityMD.com.

(Linda) And I’d like to invite everyone to discover, if you haven’t already, my favorite blog:  mindclones.blogspot.com.  Martine Rothblatt will treat you to fascinating discussions about mindclones, mindfiles and mindware that will take you far, far beyond what we are able to just sample lightly in these podcasts.  And you can find the text version of these podcasts at truthsofterasem.wordpress.com.

(Fred)  The music we use on this podcast series is called Earthseed.  It’s the Terasem Anthem.  It was written by Martine Rothblatt, who also plays the flute and the keyboard.  If you’d like to experience that music in a video, with spectacular astronomical artwork, go to the Join! tab on the terasemfaith.net website.

(Linda)  Join us, and our quest for an endless future…

(Fred)  Come with us – into Tomorrow!

Closing music – no fade – full length. 

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Posted October 25, 2011 by Truths of Terasem - Podcasts in Uncategorized

Podcast No. 71 Posted 10/20/2011   Leave a comment

Podcast No. 71 Posted 10/20/2011

Download Directly or Listen via CyBeRev at:

http://www.cyberev.org/rss/podcasts/podcast.xml

Music  – “Earthseed” fades out, as the voice recording begins.

TITLE:  Truths of Terasem – The Why of Terasem  5.10-5.10-6

SUB TITLE:  Evolutionary success requires cooperation and incorruptibility.

SUMMARY:  Extropy produces animate from inanimate matter by natural selection on a biological level, after sentience, cyberlife arises.  Cooperation and the need for absolute incorruptibility are key factors in sustainable progression and survival, and are implied by the self-survival principles of diversity, unity and joyful immortality.

 

(Fred)  Hi, we’re Fred & Linda Chamberlain, with podcast 71 on the Truths of Terasem.  This week we finish the “Why?” of Terasem.

(Linda)  Right!  We’ll look at the big picture, at where Terasem’s longest range visions lead.

(Fred)  OK!  Let’s get started.   The first Expansion for this week starts with 5.10: “Evolution brought us Terasem as it brought us life itself.”

This simply says that just as molecular evolution enabled life to arise, increased complexification of life by natural selection led to sentience that might survive the Singularity by use of geoethical nanotechnology, developing replicator nanotech without self-destruction.  And, that any culture of this kind would be a Terasem level society, a collective consciousness fulfilling early humankind’s notion of what it means for there to be a “God”.  In any case, the principle of evolution gets the credit.  If we don’t destroy ourselves, we all “win”!

(Linda)  Martin Nowak in his book, Super Cooperators: Altruism, Evolution, and Why We Need Each Other to Succeed, draws the straight line between biological and cultural evolution very well:

 “Mutation and natural selection are not enough in themselves to understand life.  You need cooperation too.  Cooperation was the principle architect of 4 billion years of evolution.  Cooperation built the first bacterial cells, then higher cells, then complex multicellular life and insect superorganisms.  Finally cooperation constructed humanity.”

(Fred) In like manner, we tend to think of Terasem as the evolutionary outgrowth of many currently existing as well as other, some long-vanished, philosophies that conceptualized how the universe worked and how humans might become, or already have become, a central part of it.  After all, there can be no collective consciousness without cooperation.  Another quote from Nowak’s Super Cooperators says it this way:

“Cooperation can draw living matter upward to higher levels of organization.  It generates the possibility for greater diversity by new specializations, new niches, and new divisions of labor.  Cooperation makes evolution constructive and open-ended.”

(Linda) Terasem, by adapting such imaginative and far reaching visions to the realities of where science and technology seem to be heading, is building an ethical framework with the capacity to adapt, mutate, grow, survive and become the core of a universal collective consciousness.

(Fred)  Richard Dawkins coined the word “meme” in his book, The Blind Watchmaker; Why the evidence of evolution reveals a universe without design.  His definition of memes fits very well with this discussion:

“The new replicators are not DNA and they are not clay crystals.  They are patterns of information that can thrive only in brains or the artificially manufactured products of brains—books, computers, and so on.  But, given that brains, books and computers exist, these new replicators which I called memes to distinguish them from genes, can propagate themselves from brain to brain, from brain to book, from book to brain, from brain to computer, from computer to computer.  As they propagate they can change—mutate.  And perhaps ‘mutant’ memes can exert the kinds of influence that I am here calling ‘replicator power’.”

(Linda) And Dawkins continues:

“Remember that this means any kind of influence affecting their own likelihood of being propagated.  Evolution under the influence of the new replicators—memic evolution—is in its infancy.  It is manifested in the phenomena that we call cultural evolution.  Cultural evolution is many orders of magnitude faster than DNA-based evolution, which sets one even more to thinking of the idea of ‘takeover’.  And if a new kind of replicator takeover is beginning, it is conceivable that it will take off so far as to leave its parent DNA far behind.”

(Fred)  Indeed, biological evolution took about four billion years or so from the emergence of life to get us to where we are today.  The coming technological Singularity, on the other hand, suggests that the next four hundred years might virtually take us through a snap, crackle, pop of extropy that would be almost equal to the Big Bang itself!  The next wave of evolution will be one of natural selection, but in a very different way than with biological life.  Biological species competed for scarce food resources, literally eating each other in the process.  That is not at all the way we hope cyber-evolution will take place.

(Linda)  Since our very lives depend on that, we’d better hope it entails cooperation rather than the bloody tooth and claw!  And, building on that 5.10.1, tells us: “Intelligence compounded can ultimately survive any environmental challenge and thrive until it becomes the environment.”  Eric Drexler, in his classic book on nanotechnology, Engines of Creation, says it this way:

“With replicating assemblers, we will be able to do more good for ourselves, yet do less harm to the Earth.  In addition, we will be able to build planet-mending machines to correct damage already done.  Cells are not all we will want to repair.

“Consider the toxic waste problem.  Whether in our air, soil, or water, wastes concern us because they can harm living systems.  But any materials that come in contact with the molecular machinery of life can themselves be reached by other forms of molecular machinery. This means that we will be able to design cleaning machines to remove these poisons wherever they could harm life.  Cleaning machines will render them harmless by rearranging their atoms.”

(Fred) The next element, 5.10.2, says “Terasem connects intelligence together with the self-survival principles of diversity, unity and joyful immortality.”  New-being creation will depart biological norms quickly.  Some may find that their thirst for creation and productivity results in self-replication and teaming up in order to specialize in synergistic ways.  Some may find harmonies with others that encourage reproduction by mindfile mergers where the originals remain and grow, while joined by hybrids of themselves, perhaps in such a way that the new beings are hybrids of two, three or even more individuals.  Some, with more private and less adventurous personalities, may remain much as they are for long periods of time.  With time, the overall character of such a civilization will change, not from turnover of population but expansion of it in uneven ways.

(Linda)  In the near future, individuals will not need to die, and this constitutes immortality for all practical purposes.  Life will be joyful, because all sources of pain, exploitation and death will have been filtered out.  Just this contrast suggests unlimited diversity, but the universality of respect for individualism will represent a binding unity among all in such a culture.

(Fred)  5.10.3 tells us: “Self-replicating systems will arise and Terasem is needed to ensure their beneficence.”  The usage of “arise” here means that in the context of a rapidly advancing technology such as ours, the principle of extropy suggests that replicator nanotechnology as distinct from biological replication will be an inevitable outcome.  We have in many other podcasts discussed the need to develop geoethical nanotech to make sure that our future technologies serve us rather than destroy us. Together with that we also need to develop strong safeguards against corruption.  We need to make sure our joyful immortality is not destroyed, perhaps even from within, like the story of Camelot.

(Linda)  True, the initial primary benefit will be the avoidance of our own self-destruction.  However, this Truth also addresses the need for beneficent interactions with other cultures, both terrestrial and extra-terrestrial.  The ethical principles of Terasem will be even more essential as humanity moves outward into the universe, to prevent the abuse of the power that such technologies will bring with it as we encounter pre-Singularity cultures.

(Fred) The likelihood of encountering pre-Singularity cultures and even post-Singularity cultures is expressed in 5.10.4:  “Extraterrestrial connections will arise and Terasem is needed to ensure their beneficence.”  In either case, it is up to us, those of us who are building Terasem, to maintain integrity as it assists and/or merges with other cultures so that its basic principles and orientation toward the realization of Joyful Immortality are preserved.

(Linda)  And, 5.10.5 builds on this, with: “Love and God are immanent in the Multiverse, but must be realized by Terasem.”  The word “immanent” means “potentially realizable”, to me, and as this Truth of Terasem so plainly states, this requires Terasem to be “realized”, which means it has to be built strong and incorruptible.

(Fred) We’ve previously covered the concept that God is technological, this is one of the core values of Terasem.  We’ve also discussed the concepts that both God and love exist only in small part now, but will continue to evolve as Terasem evolves.  It won’t happen by accident.  We who are building Terasem must take responsibility for making it happen.

(Linda)  That reminds me of a nice little quote from Charles Darwin’s The Origin of the Species:

“When I view all beings not as special creations, but as the lineal descendants of some few beings which lived long before the first bed of the Cambrian (geological) system was deposited, they seem to be to become ennobled.”

To paraphrase: Terasem, God and love are evolving and will eventually become ennobled.

(Fred) 5.10.6, the last Element in this Expansion, is:  “Faith in the future requires faith in Terasem.”  Worded inversely, this says that without a Terasem-based culture, we don’t really have a future, in the sense of a roadmap that takes us in a logical, long range, positive direction.  As Bertrand Russell said: “The only thing that will redeem mankind is cooperation”.

These issues we’ve been talking about today are very fundamental to both our ability to survive a Singularity, where thought speeds and the pace of events may accelerate beyond current rates by thousands of times or more, and ultimately achieve a condition described throughout the Truths of Terasem as “Joyful Immortality”.

(Linda)  These issues, all brought to a single focal point, reduce to ‘abuses of power’.  Egyptian and Roman slavery, religious inquisitions and wars, inter-human discrimination and exploitation, whether under the guise of unbridled capitalism, totalitarian communism, or Nazi oppression, these all reduce to abuses of power.

(Fred)  There is a paradigm that is so much of a truism we take it for granted and accept it, saying ‘it’s only human to be that way’ or ‘you can’t beat the system’, or even ‘the devil made me do it’.  We have to turn that way of thinking upside down.  We must abolish the abuse of power, not condone it.

(Linda) We talk about Terasem becoming all powerful, all present and all good.  But we also know the old saying:  ‘Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely’.  We have to replace that with the paradigm ‘Absolute power has to be absolutely incorruptible’.  And even more practically, power of any kind over other sentient beings must be so incorruptible that even its potential to be corrupted must be forever seen as a danger to be safeguarded against.

(Fred) If we cannot agree upon this as a common standard, a goal to which we wholeheartedly commit ourselves, we shape our destiny toward self-destruction, toward every horror from global nuclear suicide by means of those tens of thousands of H-bomb missiles now sitting on launching pads, to every kind of disastrous scenario so far conceived by science fiction and all those yet to be imagined.

This is what Terasem may evolve to be: a network of those who, while retaining all the diversity that joyful immortality implies, are united to abolish abuse of power as an intolerable poison that has no place in its future.  Look deeply into the Truths of Terasem, and you will find paths leading in this direction.   We must be accountable to each other in this pursuit of incorruptibility, in the pursuit of abolishing the abuse of power, as if we were a finely woven fabric of diamond fibers, indestructible by any conceivable mechanism of corruption.

(Linda) Today’s podcast reflects a unity on the part of both of us, as to a principle we believe must be part of the spirit of life, the hearts, souls, and minds of those of us who truly believe in Terasem and its destiny.  A good way to pull this all together is to use another quote from Nowak’s Super Cooperators:

“Those civilizations that have solved the problem of cooperation will persist in the cosmos.  We can only hope that this list of successful Super Cooperators will include those carbon-based life forms that we call human beings.  In this great adventure, everyone has a role to play.  Success depends on all of us.”

(Fred)  I like the last two sentences in Martine Rothblatt’s book, From Transgender to Transhuman.

“We are all part of one big human/transhuman family.  Let’s connect to each other and connect to ourselves.”

(Linda) Did you just get the last word in?

(Fred)  Definitely!  And it wasn’t easy, either!

(Linda)  And, this wraps up the “Why?” section of the Truths of Terasem.  For me, the biggest “why?” for Terasem is that it’s the most comprehensive program of its kind.

(Fred) There are a lot of other wonderful groups out there that are ideologically parallel, and that is encouraging, but Terasem is not just an armchair debating society.  Terasem is devoted to actually creating the mechanisms we will need for survival.

(Linda) After forty years in cryonics, which is a lot more about planning how to get around death than about building the future, Terasem is such a breath of fresh air that we tossed everything else aside to put our energies into building Terasem.

(Fred)  Right, Linda, and next week we’ll start the last group of the major precepts.  “How?” does Terasem work?  That’s where the rubber meets the road.   We don’t have to just sit on our hands and hope Terasem will develop.  We’ll find that there are mechanisms to help us accomplish the goals we discussed today, and throughout the Truths of Terasem.

(Linda)  In anticipation of that, let me invite listeners to add their strength to our efforts to build Terasem.  To do this, joining Terasem is a fundamental step.  It simply means expressing agreement with Terasem’s most basic principles.  Find out how easy it is to join Terasem and be part of this future.  Simply go to terasemfaith.net.

(Fred) Start building your own mindfile, without even any costs, at either CyBeRev.org or LifeNaut.com.  And you can create your personal history or autobiography, to be uploaded to CyBeRev.org by using the LifePact interview form.  Go to Terasemfaith.net and go to Mindfile Building, about half way down the page.  Plus, if you want to preserve your DNA very inexpensively, as an alternative to brain preservation or cryostasis, you can do that at LifeNaut.com, too.  And, don’t forget, Terasem is committed to helping those who join earlier, wake up in cyberspace sooner.

(Linda)  Are you an Android user?  Do you prefer the excitement of a game, over filling out questionnaires?  Then, go to PersonalityMD.com and download Mike Clancy’s new maze-based game as the fun way to build your mindfile.  A word of caution, though, it can be addicting!

(Fred)  And for those of you who crave a mind expanding blog, you can’t beat mindclones.blogspot.com.  I guarantee you that Martine Rothblatt will stretch your neurons with discussions about mindclones, mindfiles and mindware.  Oh, and don’t forget, you can find the text version of these podcasts at truthsofterasem.wordpress.com.

(Linda)  If you like the music we use on these podcasts, which runs full length at the end of each podcast,  it’s the Terasem Anthem, called Earthseed, written by Martine Rothblatt.  She also plays flute and keyboard.  For a video version of Earthseed, go to the Join! tab on the terasemfaith.net website.

(Fred)  Join us, and our quest for an endless future…

(Linda)  Come with us – into Tomorrow!

Closing music – no fade – full length. 

Posted October 25, 2011 by Truths of Terasem - Podcasts in Uncategorized

Podcast No. 70 Posted 10/17/2011   Leave a comment

Podcast No. 70 Posted 10/17/2011

Download Directly or Listen via CyBeRev at:

http://www.cyberev.org/rss/podcasts/podcast.xml

Music  – “Earthseed” fades out, as the voice recording begins.

TITLE:  Truths of Terasem – The Why of Terasem  5.9-5.9.6

SUB TITLE:  Relationship of Religion and Individualism

SUMMARY:  Terasem is rightfully described as a hard-science oriented ideology.  And yet there is nothing cruel, uncaring or harsh about the geoethical and harmonious collective consciousness that Terasem is evolving into.  The ethical standards are based on hard-science, but the need for those principles is based on the greatest foundation of foresight, compassion and love that have yet evolved from human consciousness.

(Fred)  Hi, we’re Fred & Linda Chamberlain, with podcast 70 on the Truths of Terasem.  Today we move into attitudes and feelings, and are even more focused on individual experience and ways of thinking about both ourselves and others as unique humans.

(Linda)  Terasem is rightfully described as a hard-science oriented ideology.  And yet there is nothing cruel, uncaring or harsh about the geoethical and harmonious collective consciousness that Terasem is evolving into.

(Fred)  The ethical standards are based on hard-science, but the need for those principles is based on the greatest foundation of foresight, compassion and love that have yet evolved from human consciousness.

(Linda) The first Truth of Terasem today is 5.9: “Soulful answers to the existence of Terasem can be felt as a matter of Belief.”  What would we think of as being a “soulful” answer?  It sounds like a poetic way of expressing the idea that the geo- ethics taught by Terasem are a comforting concept, like chicken soup for the soul of science-based thinkers who are aware of the dangers of the new technologies we face.

(Fred) What do we mean by “existence”, here?  Future existence?  That would be speculation on how it might evolve.  Present existence?  How it looks as it stands today?  Or, do we mean “existence at every moment from inception up to the present time”? For me, this last one is the kind of “existence” that would be meaningful.

(Linda) Yet, is it proper to leave out the farthest reaching visions of Terasem, in answering this question.  Each of us will have our own personal history of relating to Terasem, our own level of visibility into it, and our own meaning of the word “belief”, bit for me, I’d answer the question this way.  Comparing Terasem to a space vehicle, it reflects five or more years of impeccable planning and a conceptual design accommodating any mission I can imagine.  It’s already loading databases as well as launching its space-casts and its early personality emulation experiments.

(Fred)  Moving on to the first Element of this Expansion 5.9.1:  “Belief in respect for our uniqueness tells our heart we must respect the uniqueness of others.”  I’ve been fairly individualistic about how I’ve lived, unique in various ways, and I’m strongly inclined to feel very good about this stress on respecting the uniqueness of each individual.  This kind of thinking places Terasem so far from any chance of being “Borg-like” that it gives me a profound feeling of safety to be involved in it.

(Linda)  5.9.2 tells us:  “Every sensible soul feels the truth of united we stand and divided we fall.”  This is the same spirit as quoted from the meeting at which the Declaration of Independence was signed.  “If we don’t all hang together, we’ll all hang separately!” This is one of those soulful feelings, deep in our gut, about why a collective consciousness is vital to the survival of humanity.

(Fred)  Yes, and the next element is 5.9.3, which states: “Love teaches us that joy is wonderful and sadness is terrible.”  If you’ve really experienced love, you know that you’d have died for just 24 hours of it rather than have never had it happen.  If it’s a love that lasts decades and only grows stronger with time, you know that when it ends with the death of one of the partners, the one who’s left behind dies inside at the same time and usually follows soon after, even if this means going into oblivion.  If you haven’t known love like this, or if you’ve had a love die quickly and never found another, believing it to be impossible, then this may seem difficult to grasp.  But there is a very deep truth in this one, and it is generalized to wider and wider circles in the kind of emergent society Terasem seeks to become.

(Linda) 5.9.4 says: “Immortality is everywhere believed in because it is wired into the human soul.”  I think that Michael Perry, in Forever for All, says the same thing, and says it very well:

“Many would agree that there are shortcomings in the human condition that one might like to overcome—but the means are not at hand.  The main shortcoming of this sort is the finite life span.  People seek something more than this present existence.  They would instead prefer a reasonable immortality, a good life beyond the death that up to now has been the lot of living things on Earth.  That immortality in some form is our rightful destiny is, to such a viewpoint, no idle thought or daydream but a deep-seated conviction of the most serious sort.  This conviction has been arrived at often and independently, as the records of numerous cultures attest, and in it people have seen fit to rest and defend their hopes, in the face of formidable obstacles.”

(Fred)  Yes, but I think the best part of what Perry has to say on that subject is:

“Indeed, many have willingly faced death rather than renounce their particular ideas and practices regarding a hoped for immortality.  This is all the more remarkable in that no shred of material, verifiable evidence exists that anyone has ever achieved immortality or a life after death.  Something so problematic and challenging, a hope up to now unsubstantiated, has been a necessity to many; among them I number myself.”

(Linda)  Humans are capable of believing this for many, many reasons.  Just like the Earth seems obviously flat, it seems obvious  to living, conscious creatures, that life, consciousness, must go on… if not in the same form as we now know it to exist, then surely in some other form.  It’s a soulful reaction.  In the earliest long-distance trading circles of primitive peoples, when there would be an annual gathering and those of many tribes would see again those they had not seen for a year, it was easy to visualize that a person still existed, even if not seen.

(Fred) The myth that persons survive death emerged early, and systematic attempts to do something meaningful that fitted this outlook began with burial rites or other practices as far back as organized humankind has been traced.  With the rise of more sophisticated philosophies, a soul-body dualism or dichotomy arose that remained the heart of vitalism, a philosophy still prevalent even today.

(Linda)  Is there a physical basis for such a belief?  That life is more than matter and energy, like all else in the universe.  That life requires some kind of magic spark.  Suppose, for example, you were to ask, “Is it possible that a basis for identity might exist within the body, based on physical energy, but weighed nothing and could not be differentiated from ordinary metabolic and associated processes?”  Could such a question be answered rationally, so that it would make sense to claim that something corresponding to a “soul” existed, but was of a nature such that no scientific evidence had yet proven that it was other than a fantasy?

(Fred)  The answer might be that the organization and functions of the human neurological system might represent an informational structure that cannot be weighed, but that in a similar sense, the informational content of a computer cannot be weighed either.  The computer that has not even had an operating system installed, much less any specialized software, does not weigh less on that account.  Yet, it is as “dumb” as can be imagined.  Even the future computers that will have processing speed and memory compatible with sophisticated mindware and mindfiles will be only dumb machines prior to loading.

(Linda) A biological human baby, to carry this example forward, is in much the same situation.  By comparison, a chimpanzee who has learned the social structures of its group is far ahead of the newly born human infant, in so many ways that it would be difficult to find a place to start in describing the differences.  The infant perhaps could be compared to a “blank” computer only in that the computer’s individual components might have read-only-memory utilities embedded, certain power management interlocks, and voltage regulation that would prevent it from low level failures on first power-up.  Otherwise, it would be as “dumb” as the preloaded computer.

(Fred) The situation changes as the human grows and adapts, though, acquiring at least one language, social skills and information, and finally reaches adulthood.  Now, without any like changes in weight or power consumption of the brain, an informational structure exists which is of such complexity as to believe that it could not be destroyed, if one did not know much about it’s nature, origin, or destiny (biological death).

(Linda)  So, in addition to the comforting, soulful idea that a joyful immortality is hard-wired into us, we also find that our emerging technologies will finally make that long-held goal, of living as long as we may choose, a reality.

(Fred)  Here, Terasem leaves no stone unturned, conceptually.  Not only does it conceive that by mindfiles this can be accomplished, but the traces left in other’s people’s minds who knew a person could provide a starting point for emulating that person and allowing them to continue with their life.  Beyond that, there is the idea that a person’s life may leave behind a “wake” or disturbance in society like ripples spreading out from the passage of a dolphin just beneath the surface of the ocean, so that in the end, far fewer people are lost in the transcendence of biology into cyberspace.

(Linda)  The last two elements are very inter-related.  And although they may be very soulful concepts, they are also based on hard science. The next to the last element, 5.9.5, states, “Explaining the purpose of life is as simple as seeing life’s beauty, and wishing it everywhere.”  At first this sounds like just an obvious observation.  But it is really saying something very much deeper than that.

It’s time for the short version of my favorite Carl Sagan quote again:  “Star stuff pondering the stars.”  In his book, The Intelligent Universe, James Gardner expands meaningfully on that:

“The universe is coming to life.  Not generating living beings haphazardly as the result of a random toss of the chemical dice.  Not transforming inert matter into a growing, evolving biosphere as the consequence of a spectacularly improbable cosmic accident that happened, against all odds (and perhaps only once throughout all of space and time), on an ordinary planet orbiting an undistinguished star in the outer reaches of an ordinary galaxy.

“No, the universe is coming to life, purposely and in accordance with a finely tuned cosmic code that is the precise functional equivalent of DNA in the terrestrial biosphere.  The universe, under this interpretation, is a kind of vast emerging organism in the process of self-assembly and self-animation, endowed with the capacity to not only replicate itself, but also to transmit heritable traits—that same cosmic code, consisting of the laws and constants of physics, which not only prescribes an ontogenetic program, but, again similar to DNA, furnishes a recipe for the self–assembly of offspring (so-called baby universes).

“The essence of what I am calling the “Selfish Biocosm” hypothesis is that the universe we are privileged to inhabit is literally in the process of transforming itself from inanimate to animate matter… Under this theory, the emergence of life and intelligence are not meaningless accidents in a hostile, largely lifeless cosmos but exist at the very heart of the vast machinery of creation, cosmological evolution, and cosmic replication.”

(Fred)  This a very broad insight, and in ways corresponds to the visions of Paolo Soleri in his 1969 book, “The City in the Image of Man”, where he foresees that if humanity does not destroy itself, it will ultimately move upward in the course of evolution beyond technology into what he calls the “Compassionate Aesthetic Domain”.  Soleri puts it this way:

“The beauty of nature is achieved in the awesome reservoirs of space and time where things are hammered out in the order that probability dictates, justly, rationally, impassionately.  The genesis of man-made beauty, the aesthetic, is of a different nature.  It is not incidental to man’s action but is the very essence of man himself.  By necessity it has to be frugal.  It does away with probability and predictability.  It is synthetic and transfigurative.  It is never irrational because it is always superrational.  It cannot simply be just, because it must also be compassionate.

“With the aesthetogenesis of nature, man reaches into the structure of reality and forms a new universe in his own image.  Arcology (architecture plus ecology) can be one of these forms.  Arcology is essentially an aesthetocompassionate phenomenon.”

(Linda)  And 5.9.6, ties it all up with a big golden ribbon:  “Faith in Terasem arises from soulful certainty that this is what the Multiverse must become.”  More than anything, to me, this is an expression of confidence in the principle of Extropy moving with exponentially increasing rapidity toward a point in time not so many centuries from now when by anything we can presently visualize, order in the universe will replace disorder with all of the closure that has been imagined to have characterized the spread of matter and energy immediately following the Big Bang, except in an inverse way.

(Fred)  All right.  I’m going to have the last word!  Or, maybe Ray Kurzweil will.  I want to quote from his Foreword to Gardner’s book, The Intelligent Universe:

“Clearly, the universe we live in does appear to be an intelligent design, in that the constants in nature are precisely what are required for the universe to have grown in complexity.  If the cosmological constant, the Plank constant, and the many other constants of physics were set to just slightly different values, atoms, molecules, stars, planets, organisms, humans, and this book would have been impossible.  As Jim Gardner says, ‘A multitude of…factors are fine-tuned with fantastic exactitude to a degree that renders the cosmos almost spookily bio-friendly.’”

(Linda)  Well, we can’t stop there, though, Kurzweil continues:

“Or perhaps our universe is not someone’s science experiment, but rather the result of an evolutionary process.  Leonard Susskind, the developer of string theory, and Lee Smolin, a theoretical physicist and expert on quantum gravity, have suggested that universes give rise to other universes in a natural, evolutionary process that gradually refines the natural constants.  Smolin postulates that universes best able to produce black holes are the ones that are most likely to reproduce.  Smolin explains, ‘Reproduction through black holes lead to a multiverse in which the conditions for life are common—essentially because some of the conditions life requires, such as plentiful carbon, also boost the formation of stars massive enough to become black holes.”

(Fred)  I think you did me out of my last word, so I have to add this last paragraph from Kurzweil’s Foreword:

“As an alternative to Smolin’s concept of it being a coincidence that black holes and biological life both need similar conditions (such as large amounts of carbon), Jim Gardner and I have put forth the conjecture that it is precisely the intelligence that derives from biological life and its technological creations that are likely to engineer new universes with intelligently set parameters.  In this thesis, there is still an important role for black holes, because black holes represent the ultimate computer.  Now that Stephen Hawking has conceded that we can get information out of a black hole (because the particles comprising the Hawking radiation remain quantum-entangled with particles flying into the black hole), the extreme density of matter and energy in a black hole make it the ultimate computer.  If we think of evolving universes as the ultimate evolutionary algorithm, the utility function (that is, the property being optimized in an evolutionary process) would be its ability to produce intelligent computation.”

(Linda)  Okay, you win!  That’s a great place to end this podcast!  Next week we look at how evolution implies not only the spontaneous emergence of life, but the spontaneous emergence of what has always been envisioned as “God”, as intelligence expands like an explosion in reverse.  It’s a beautiful follow-on for the Truths we covered this week.

(Fred)  Right, Linda, and next week is also the start of the final or sixth precept of Terasem’s, “How” does Terasem work?  It’s a broad landscape of ideas, going all the way from how to make use of rituals and programs in a rational way to creating ways for geoethical nanotechnology to be part of the self-ordering of the Multiverse, everywhere.  Actually, the term “rituals” is barely mentioned at all, just as if it were there so as to not be left out, but we’ll expand on that.

(Linda)  Another reason we’ll expand on that is because they’re so important.     As just one example, if after Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address, it had become institutionalized into all the schools so that children repeated it each morning, instead of the “Pledge to the U.S. flag”, all of the conflicts of segregation that went on for many, many decades and still litter our cultural landscape today with pain and darkness of the past might have been swept away before the beginning of the Twentieth Century.  Rituals, if used intelligently, can help us transcend old, mistaken ideas and move into the future faster and more safely than practically anything else we can imagine.

(Fred)  Wow!  What an example.  Sounds like a perfect time to invite listeners to find out how to join Terasem and be part of spreading these life-enhancing memes.  It’s as easy as going to terasemfaith.net.  And if you like the idea of being part of this sojourn into the future, without even any cost, start building your own mindfile at either CyBeRev.org or LifeNaut.com.  And you can create your personal history or autobiography, to be uploaded to CyBeRev.org by using the LifePact interview form.  Go to Terasemfaith.net and go to Mindfile Building, about half way down the page.  You can preserve some of your DNA at LifeNaut.com, too, very inexpensively.

(Linda)  Or, if you prefer to make a game of building your mindfile, Terasem’s powerful new Android app, described at PersonalityMD.com will make it all the more fun for you.   It results in personality profiles that are truly unique to you, and you also see how you compare to others’ geographically near you, with mindsets like yours.

(Fred)  Still have some unanswered questions about mindfiles?  Go to Martine Rothblatt’s blog at mindclones.blogspot.com.  But don’t read this blog before going to bed… your mind will be so fired up, you won’t  get to sleep all night!

(Linda)  If you like the music we use on these podcasts, it’s the Terasem Anthem, called Earthseed, written by Martine Rothblatt.  She also plays flute and keyboard.  For a video version of Earthseed, go to the Join! tab on the terasemfaith.net website.

(Fred)  Don’t forget that these podcasts are available in text form at our site, truthsofterasem.wordpress.com.  You’ll find a lot of good stuff there, like tabs relating to storing DNA with LifeNaut, information about a “city of the future” in Second Life named after the great innovator Paolo Soleri, and you can download a free copy of Dr. Perry’s book, Forever for All, that we quote so often on our podcasts.

(Linda)  Join us, and our quest for an endless future…

(Fred)  Come with us – into Tomorrow!

 

Closing music – no fade – full length.

Posted October 19, 2011 by Truths of Terasem - Podcasts in Uncategorized

Podcast No. 69 Posted 10/17/2011   Leave a comment

Podcast No. 69 Posted 10/17/2011

Download Directly or Listen via CyBeRev at:

http://www.cyberev.org/rss/podcasts/podcast.xml

Music  – “Earthseed” fades out, as the voice recording begins.

TITLE:  Truths of Terasem – The Why of Terasem  5.8-5.8.6

SUB TITLE:  Relationship of Religion and Individualism

SUMMARY:  Monotheistic religions seem to be contrary to individualism, but that is because most are monolithically dominated by hierarchy and dogma.  In contradistinction to this, Terasem replaces hierarchy with networking, and dogma with non-stop inquiry, learning, and open discussion of issues.

(Fred)  Hi, we’re Fred & Linda Chamberlain, with podcast 69 on the Truths of Terasem.  This week we reconcile individualism with religion.  Where hard questions of all kinds are welcome and dogma is booted out.

(Linda) That’s exactly right!  We’re intolerant of intolerance, and we close the door to being closed-minded.  Today we trade in sacred ideas for rational hypotheses, and see not only how belief and individualism are compatible, but how this is a good way for creative thinking to be put to the test of natural selection!

(Fred)  I know this must sound like heresy, but we haven’t even taken the first concept out of the box, and yet just the tone of this sort of thinking strikes terror in the hearts of those who believe that blind faith has value, who want to escape the responsibility of thinking for themselves by turning this over to some high priest whose words they dare not question.

(Linda) No doubt it was just such blind trust that reassured those who witnessed human sacrifices at the stone temples of the Aztecs and the Mayans or those who were in the plaza when Giordano Bruno was burned at the stake for the heresy of saying that the stars were probably suns, only far away, perhaps with planets and other beings living on those planets.

(Fred)  At the same time, we will not fail to recognize that churches have, in many other ways, fostered higher moral principles, and taught love and caring as a way of life within their communities.  We will not forget that they envisioned endless lives as a possible and proper destiny, long before such could actually be shown to be reasonable.  Perhaps most positively, although fraught by paradoxical happenings (such as catastrophes a God could have prevented, but did not) and lack of clear evidence (of existence), religions conceived the inconceivable, now soon likely to become a reality, that beings with the powers of angels might exist, and that they might all answer to a single, even higher level consciousness, possessing unlimited power, knowledge, and be able to protect against evil as well as prevent death.

(Linda) With those thoughts in mind, let’s look at the Truths of Terasem for this week, starting with 5.8:  “Religions are supported by Terasem because its transreligious themes are synchronous with monotheistic faiths.”  This simply states that the ethics of Terasem are not in conflict with the primary teachings of most of the world’s more modern religious moral systems, but instead encompass and expands upon them.

(Fred) Broadly interpreted, the term “monotheistic faiths” refers to moral philosophies that evolved out of earlier belief systems which often involved many gods, such as a god of war, a god of love, etc.  Monotheism evolved as a more sophisticated level of thinking about ethical principles and how each individual fits into such a system.

(Linda)   And Terasem supports other religious philosophies because they, like Terasem, value the importance of human solidarity as we move into a future that not only holds great promise, but great dangers as well.  A flyer that tries to introduce the Terasem ethics to visitors in a single page, says it this way:

“Terasem is a Singularity, hard-science oriented ideology.  It holds, among other things, that during the latter part of this century, humans may transcend biological origins.  Many of us will move our identities into cyberspace, experiencing speeds of thought thousands of times faster than what we experience today.  The development of replicator nanotechnology in the next few decades will further change our world in an explosive way.  The history of technological advances teaches us that it can be used for either good or evil.

(Fred)  Continuing with this quote from the flyer:

“Evil can be taken to be the baggage that permitted us to unfold through extropy to our present state, where competition with combat, domination and exploitation, true “survival of the fittest” was the mechanism.  That must all be left behind.  We must find people who grasp this vision and pledge to be totally transparent to each other, totally accountable to each other, without hidden agendas, compassionate toward their past acts, understanding their evolutionary roots and how it is now essential to modify those roots so that they no longer keep us mired in competition and domination.” 

(Linda)  And it concludes with:

“Terasem means “Earth-Seed”.  The Truths of Terasem are far reaching ethical principles designed to help guide us as we leave the confines of earth and biology; as we approach a future where, as expressed in the Terasem Pledge, unity and diversity are the key to survival.  We invite you to explore Terasem and consider joining our efforts to build a safe, ethical, and positive passage through the Singularity and into cyberspace.”

(Fred)  Terasem recognizes that any collective consciousness that can survive a Singularity will find itself in harmony with others that have done so, to such an extent that they will network easily and harmoniously, not engaging in some kind of primitive territorial conflicts as presupposed would be the case for independently evolved cultures as imagined, for example, in most science fiction.

(Linda)  I agree.  In any encounter with another civilization that might take place as Terasem expands into the Cosmos, a cultural “merger” would be expected to result.  At that level, “culture” would be expected to mean such a highly interconnected set of minds that “collective consciousness” would be descriptive.  Thus, “cultural merger” would constitute a “consciousness merger” of the two cultures, wouldn’t it?

(Fred)  Yes, and it is important to bear in mind, discussing encounters of cultures and their mergers, to recall that as one of its most fundamental tenets, Terasem recognizes the individuality and right of pursuit of individual joy as a hallmark of each who is part of it.

(Linda) Cultures might merge, but individuals would not.  If in expanding into the Cosmos, Terasem were to encounter a “Borg-like culture”, like from the Star Trek series, that had survived a Singularity, but was comprised of “faceless” individuals, that would represent an exception.  Clearly, Terasem could not, would not, merge with such a monstrosity.

(Fred) On the other hand, one might say that Terasem does not find it plausible that such a “hive-mind” type of culture could have survived a Singularity.  Rather, we find it far more reasonable to expect that cultures that had evolved along Borg-like lines would have destroyed themselves in their Singularities or have stagnated, Pre-Singularity.

(Linda) Getting back to the Elements of this Expansion of the Truths of Terasem, 5.8.1 says:  “There is but one God, yet that God must be completed by us in the future”.  We might take this to mean that if we set out to “build God” but can’t unite, within the human community, as to how this is to be done, we are not likely to survive the technological Singularity but will go down in a grey goo holocaust, the outcome of an arms race in which the nanobots are the only winners.

(Fred) The most positive outlook is that we will find common ground by way of a universally consented Geoethical Nanotechnology, and along with that construct the more general framework of ethical principles Terasem is beginning to evolve, so in the end one and only one collective consciousness will be the outcome.

(Linda) At terasemfaith.net, on the “Beliefs” tab, the four Core Beliefs of Terasem are spelled out.  These are:  (1)  Life is purposeful, (2) Death is optional, (3) God is technological, and (4) Love is essential.

The third one is really what we’re talking about here.  The website expands on that very nicely by saying: “We are making God as we are implementing technology that is ever more all-knowing, ever-present, all-powerful and beneficent. Geoethical nanotechnology will ultimately connect all consciousness and control the cosmos”.

(Fred) Next, in 5.8.2, the words are: “Hope and prayer are reasonable because the evolving Godness can transpotently respond to collective consciousness.”  To translate this into an individual’s perception, as part of Terasem’s collective consciousness, we might say, “Keep your vision on positive outcomes because our growing technological competence and our commitment to the principle of geoethical nanotechnology will grow exponentially and allow us to support each other in ways that earlier, more traditional monotheistic philosophies imagined a “God” might respond.  And, I guess, prayer, as a form of affirmation, serves this purpose.

(Linda)  Individualism comes to the surface in 5.8.3, which states: “Everlasting joy is achievable via cyber-resurrection in the body of God-in-the-making, the collective consciousness of Terasem.”  Here, at the risk of losing some of the broader vision, I’m inclined to translate this as follows: For the best chances to live on endlessly in the most free, creative, ecstatic way possible, it seems necessary to move our identities out of these flimsy biological platforms into which we were born, and join with others who share our vision in a cyber-reality where we are networked intimately and yet uncompromised as to individuality and privacy.

(Fred)  In his book, Forever for All, Michael Perry says that very nicely:

“We are the ones who must shape the future.  We thus must supply the standards for determining what ought to be, both in the large and the small details, as well as find the means to bring it all about.  However, it is not the we of today through whom these problems will take their more definitive forms and find their better solutions.  These matters will fall to our developing future selves, who, we imagine, will progress in various directions as needs and interests require.  There is important preliminary work that we ought to be doing today, however.  The future, then, is a growth process for the individual, who, starting here and now, with passing time will more closely approach perfection and fulfillment.”

(Linda) Individualism requires responsible action, however.  Anarchy is not the way to this kind of life, nor is unbridled exploitation of others.  5.8.4 tells us:  “Morality is the purpose of life, for it is acting to make life better for all.”  This doesn’t answer the question “What is morality?” to be sure, but it does suggest that “win-win” relationships are the key.

(Fred) Right, and, on a deeper level, it suggests that we have moved beyond natural selection as the way life evolves.  Clearly, natural selection has a very different purpose than “making life better for all”.  It is about survival of the species, or the most fit, whether we are talking about individuals or organizations.  Many individuals must die, so that only the most fit may survive to pass on their genes, among biological creatures, and many must die, so that only the fit may pass on their memes, among organizations.

(Linda)  It will be a different world in a Terasem cybercivilization. Morality will be on a different, far more compassionate vector.

(Fred)  5.8.5 is an affirmation of individualism, in saying, “Eternal truths are diversity (individual value), unity (sisterhood-brotherhood-solidarity) and joyful immortality (unlimited love).”  We are reassured that there is no intent to suppress joy, limit the length of life, or enforce some kind of obnoxious conformity.

(Linda)  In this respect, Terasem leaves traditional religion behind, placing the individual on an equal plain with the whole culture, versus the view that only the overall collective, such as the species, holds importance.

(Fred) Finally for this Expansion,  5.8.6 tells us:  “Sacred holidays and artifacts are important wellsprings for the memes needed to complete God as Terasem.”  The word “sacred” can be taken many ways.  This could mean “not to be questioned”, but that is far from what Terasem means here.

(Linda)  Then perhaps a more productive way to view a concept like “a sacred holiday” would be a day on which all are free of other obligations to retire to some kind of sanctuary for private contemplation, or if they choose, to be close to each other if they wished to join in celebrations and gatherings to share ideas, to renew commitments, and to celebrate, give thanks for life.

(Fred) The term “artifacts” usually has to do with physical objects.  We all know how inspiring art and poetry can be.

(Linda)  Next week we’ll look into attitudes and feelings, and look with even more focus on individual experience and ways of thinking about both ourselves and others as unique humans.  Terasem is rightfully described as a hard-science oriented ideology.  And yet there is nothing cruel, uncaring or harsh about the geoethical and harmonious collective consciousness that Terasem is evolving into.  The ethical standards are based on hard-science, but the need for those principles is based on the greatest foundation of foresight, compassion, wisdom and love that have yet evolved from human consciousness.

(Fred)   If you want to emerge in cyberspace sooner rather than later, then, as we said earlier, ‘joining’ Terasem is a very fundamental step.  We need your strength in helping build a culture built on foresight, compassion, wisdom and love.  Find out more about joining Terasem at terasemfaith.net.  Be part of this exciting future, start building your mindfile at either CyBeRev.org or LifeNaut.com.

(Linda) And you can create your personal history or autobiography, to be uploaded to CyBeRev.org by using the LifePact interview form.  Go to Terasemfaith.net and go to Mindfile Building, about half way down the page.   Remember, there are no fees for building or storing your mindfile.  And if you want to create a BioFile by preserving your DNA, you can do that at LifeNaut.com, very inexpensively, too.

(Fred))  For those of you who love games, Mike Clancy, at Terasem, has created the new maze-based, mindfile game for the Android. It’s addictive because the difficulty ramps up quickly with multiple layers of challenges.  While you are trying to build motor neurons inside a brain, plaques are obstructing your path and you have to avoid macrophages that are hunting you down!  Check it out on PersonalityMD.com.

(Linda) If you’d like some to fascinating discussions about mindclones, mindfiles and mindware by Martine Rothblatt, go to my favorite blog:  mindclones.blogspot.com. 

(Fred)  And you can find the text version of these podcasts at truthsofterasem.wordpress.com. 

(Linda)  And don’t forget, Terasem has a priority list; those who join earlier are most likely to make the jump to cyberspace sooner.  The longer you wait, the longer the line will get!

(Fred)  If you’ve been enjoying the music that we use on this podcast series, it’s called Earthseed.  It’s the Terasem Anthem.  It was written by Martine Rothblatt, who also plays the flute and the keyboard.  If you’d like to experience that music in a video, with spectacular astronomical artwork, go to the Join! tab on the terasemfaith.net website.

(Linda)  Join us, and our quest for an endless future…

(Fred)  Come with us – into Tomorrow!

Closing music – no fade – full length.   

Posted October 18, 2011 by Truths of Terasem - Podcasts in Uncategorized

Podcast No. 68 Posted 10/10/2011   Leave a comment

Podcast No. 68 Posted 10/10/2011

Download Directly or Listen via CyBeRev at:

http://www.cyberev.org/rss/podcasts/podcast.xml

Music  – “Earthseed” fades out, as the voice recording begins.

TITLE:  Truths of Terasem – The Why of Terasem  5.7-5.7.6

SUB TITLE:  The evolutionary pathway to god.

SUMMARY:  This week we look at a magical transformation, where the vision of Terasem we spoke about last week is a glove-fit for what most conventional religions mean by “God”: an evolutionary outcome of exponential infotechnology based on the development of nanotechnology, which in turn depends on collective insistence upon Geoethics”

(Fred)  Hi, we’re Fred & Linda Chamberlain, with podcast number 68 on the Truths of Terasem.

(Linda)  Here’s where we talk about what Terasem will ultimately evolve into.

(Fred)  Yes, it is.  And the challenge is indeed enormous.  Here, we address the really big idea that as Terasem moves from a state of networked human identities toward a universal collective consciousness, like we discussed last week, those attributes assigned to “God” by early human religions will become in fact realizable through technology as the Singularity takes place.

(Linda)   How can we even begin to describe a thing like that?  I mean, imagine just for a moment that Leonardo da Vinci had come up with a drawing of a Boeing 747 and said, “Here’s how man will be able to fly like a bird!”  Not only would he have been thought totally out of his mind, but in fact he wouldn’t have had any basis of sufficient science or technology to even approach such a vision realistically.  It seems like what we’re delving into here is terribly elusive!

(Fred)  That’s certainly how most people will encounter it on the surface, at first glance, but that’s what happens when you try to visualize where things may lead if you look not just far ahead, but “endlessly” ahead.  The simplest example, for me, is the attempt to depict two parallel lines going to infinity.  What do you do?  You draw what looks like an upside down “V” where the sidewalk in front of your shrinks to a point on the horizon.  You know the lines are supposed to be perfectly parallel, but the eye sees them as converging to a point.  I think this is the kind of thing we’re getting into here, but on a far more abstract level.

(Linda)  I know, but there’s a discomfort in it, isn’t there?  It’s such a different way of thinking about things than most people are used to!

(Fred)  It sure is!  The “flat earth” mentality hangs on today in many ways, even after we’ve “walked on the moon” and sent the Voyager spacecraft on their way to the stars.  It must have been terribly disconcerting to envision that the Earth was “round”, floating in space, after millennia of envisioning that it was flat, as it so certainly appears to be at first glance.  We still talk about the Sun ‘rising in the East’ and ‘setting in the West’, although we know perfectly well that in the first case the Earth is ‘rotating toward the Sun’ and in the second that it is ‘rotating away from it’.

(Linda)  Great example!  Let’s plunge in!  5.7 says: “Expect God in the future by building Godness today”.   In order to dig into that, I’m reminded of a comment you posted not so long ago on one of Martine Rothblatt’s mindclone blog postings.  She had talked about the fact that some people may think it will be weird for there to be cyberbeings such as you and I envision becoming, but offered lots of thoughts about the fact that it would be a really good kind of weird, the kind of weirdness we should hope the future would hold, vs. much worse kinds of weirdness that we can see all around us in the world today.  It was a great treatment of the subject, but in reading your comment I found you slipping right into the kind of thing this set of the Truths of Terasem points to.  About “godness”!  It was your posting.  Why don’t you read it:

(Fred)  Okay.

“As mindclones become self-conscious and extremely intelligent, the mixed feelings held by many will be that while we need them and can’t do without them, we also have to be able to “trust” them. Any “mean streak” in a mindclone could be disastrous. Mindclones will hold so much responsibility and power that they must be positively oriented, compassionate and devoid of all those things we accept so easily in each other by saying, “It’s only human!” (to be that way).

“One lecturer on philosophical topics of the early 1970’s, Nathaniel Brandon, commented on the notion that God was conceived to be “all good”. He stated that in the days before monotheistic religions, the viewpoint might have been that if the God of the Sea turned out to be a malevolent monster, perhaps the God of Lightning would intervene on one’s behalf, and that even the “God of Gods” (Zeus, Marduk, etc.) at least had to contend with their “fellow Gods” in matters where good and evil were concerned. “But,” Brandon added, “If there were only one God, and it were a vicious tyrant, then this would be horrible; there would be no escape from eternal tyranny, thus, the monotheistic God had to be conceived of as “all good”.

“In many ways, biohumans will soon come to think of mindclones, who sooner or later will “run the world”, as “Gods”, due to their greater power, and the only way to be safe as that comes about will be to choose solutions in which there is a high degree of confidence that these personalities will be wholly benevolent and constructive, in other words “good”.

“One workable way this might be achieved is for these self-conscious and “Godlike” entities to be bound by an untarnishable code of ethics, accountable to each other, focused on the ridding of the world of cruelty (and certainly not being responsible for any of it themselves). They must be pledged to seek better answers to any problems that arise, varied enough in their skills to handle any conceivable problem, and yet united in their dedication to positive values and committed enough to a common ethical code so that biopeople (the great majority of humans, who are still biological) can “sleep at night”.

“Where would such a community of cyberpersons come from? How could a collection of humans be gathered together who would, in seeking to be emulated and virtually “become” cyberbeings, at the same time be willing to be obligated to such a high standard of conduct? The answer is that this is precisely what Terasem is creating, a community of persons accountable to each other and pledged to unity of high ethical standards (under the name “Geoethical Nanotechnology”), who want at the same time to able to “be themselves as individuals” in cyberspace, experiencing so much positive reinforcement that there is no better way to describe this than calling it “joyful immortality”.

“There is a wholly rational basis for the parallels envisioned between the “Terasem Collective Consciousness” and the ideas humans have nurtured since their earliest days, of what a “God” must be like. There is only one way for mindclones to be “free and independent” and at the same time to be “safe to empower”. Not everyone will want to have to toe the mark to such a demanding standard, but neither will it be acceptable for there to be a group of super-mentalities loose in cyberspace who are constantly at war with each other, battling in the ways described in fiction concerning Greek or Roman Gods, largely unsympathetic to the suffering of “lesser beings”.

“Nanotechnology must be safely developed. It will be developed in any case, but if it is not safely developed, then the horrors of a “grey goo” catastrophe will make earlier fears of a nuclear holocaust seem only a mere premonition of dangers of obliteration of the entire biosphere, where a single mistake could “end the world”.

“The future, in any case, will be ‘weird’. Let’s be sure it is a very, very good kind of ‘weirdness’!

(Linda) Well, with that as background, let’s get back to the Truth of Terasem we’re talking about.  To repeat, it says, in 5.7: “Expect God in the future by building Godness today.”  Well, that’s exactly what we’re doing by moving into an era of technology where cyberbeings are going to ‘go’ self-conscious.  Just as your comment on Martine’s blog suggests, we’re already in the process of building godness.

(Fred) In the elements of this Expansion, we begin with: 5.7.1 “Every religion says God, and only God, is all-knowing, all-good and all-powerful.”  Well, in fact that is what every religion, or at least 99.99% of them, say, and there’s a good reason for it.  Just as Nathaniel Brandon pointed out, it’s very scary to say anything else.

(Linda) The history of technological advances, all the way back to the discovery of how to tame fire, teaches us that knowledge can be used for either good or evil.  Evil can be taken to be the baggage that permitted us to unfold through extropy to our present state, where competition with combat, domination and exploitation, true “survival of the fittest” was the mechanism.

(Fred) Absolutely.  As we continue to build ‘godness’, that kind of evolutionary baggage must all be left behind.  We must find people who grasp this vision and pledge to be totally transparent to each other, totally accountable to each other, without hidden agendas, compassionate toward their past acts, understanding their evolutionary roots and how it is now essential to modify those roots so that they no longer keep us mired in competition and domination.

(Linda) In 5.7.2 we find: “Xanadu would describe earth, or even freedom from cruelty, if anything all-knowing, all-good and all-powerful existed.”  Xanadu is not discussed elsewhere in the Truths, but Wikipedia gives us, “Xanadu was visited by Venetian explorer Marco Polo in 1275, who wrote the following, one of the most complete descriptions of the city as it existed: “And when you have ridden three days from the city last mentioned, between north-east and north, you come to a city called Chandu, which was built by the Khan now reigning. There is at this place a very fine marble Palace, the rooms of which are all gilt and painted with figures of men and beasts and birds, and with a variety of trees and flowers, all executed with such exquisite art that you regard them with delight and astonishment.”  This was a city of ancient China envisioned to come as close to Heaven as possible.  One might, at that time, have imagined that a “God” must have created it.  Perhaps the meaning here is that almost one thousand years ago humans had begun to make physical strides toward what they envisioned as perfection, but what will be far easier to achieve first in cyberspace, and then later by emulating physical reality once full-scale replicator nanotechnology is available.

(Fred) In 5.7.3 we find, “Partial Godness now exists to the extent the collective consciousness of Terasem now prevails.”  We have to move toward where we’re going in small steps, but they’re getting larger and coming in faster succession as suggested in the next Truth, 5.7.4, “Exponential infotechnology and nanotechnology growth enables Terasem to rapidly evolve toward our future all-knowing, all-powerful God.”

(Linda) This is consistent with all that we’ve said earlier.  5.7.5 tells us, “Collective insistence upon geoethics and the Terasem Way of Life makes our evolving Godness all-good.”  We need to have the widest possible consent and agreement about Geoethics, in order to escape the possibilities of self-destruction as replicator nanotechnology is developed, or even irreversible damage to humankind earlier by way of biotech catastrophes or nuclear war.

(Fred) Finally, 5.7.6 sums it up with “Terasem is God-in-the-making because Terasem is becoming all-knowing, all-good and all-powerful, and is partially so now.”  This is an affirmation of what we’re committed to.  The endpoint is far off, but the rate of approach is increasingly rapid.  The Singularity is near.

(Linda)  The end of the podcast is also near.  Next week we’ll examine the ways in which Terasem’s trans-religious themes are in synch with monotheism, and how hope and prayer can aid reason in building our  collective consciousness.  Terasem’s vision of cyberspace is that it can be a pathway to what we’ve been talking about as “joyful immortality” from the first, but only if we “keep it clean”.  There is even the idea that morality is “the purpose of life’ in that it’s goal is to make life better for all.  Some principles are defined as “Eternal truths” and we explore ways to make sacred holidays and artifacts the “wellsprings for memes”.

(Fred)  Right.  Some visions, yet to be validated as scientifically possible have to be contingently taken as “matters of belief”, especially in the need to respect the uniqueness of others.  United we stand — divided we fall.  Love as an experience teaches us that joy is wonderful and sadness is terrible, and that immortality is everywhere believed in because it is wired into the human soul.  Explaining the purpose of life is as simple as seeing life’s beauty, and wishing it everywhere, which leads to a kind of soulful certainty that this is what the Multiverse must become.

(Linda)  Hey, everybody, join Terasem at terasemfaith.net if you want to share in this adventure.  Your “future in cyberspace starts with involvement in the programs of CyBeRev.org and LifeNaut.com, no fees to participate.  And you can create your personal history or autobiography, to be uploaded to CyBeRev.org by using the LifePact interview form.  Go to Terasemfaith.net and go to Mindfile Building, about half way down the page.

(Fred) And if you want to preserve your DNA very inexpensively, you can do that at LifeNaut.com, too.   For those who can’t afford cryostasis at this time, the most practical approach to identity preservation is to have a mindfile plus a biofile (your DNA).  Take the BioFile tab at truthsofterasem.wordpress.com for additional information on the cell storage program.

(Linda)  Again, and we can’t say it often enough, big kudos to Mike Clancy, at Terasem, who created that challenging, fun and addictive mindfile building game for the Android. The multiple layers of the game ramp up the challenge very quickly.  While you try to build motor neurons within a brain, you encounter plaques that obstruct your path and you have to dodge macrophages that are hunting you down.  Check it out at PersonalityMD.com.

(Fred)  And if you still need to blow a few more of your neurons, go to  mindclones.blogspot.com for fascinating discussions about mindclones, mindfiles and mindware.  And if you want to read the text of our podcasts, to help to dig deeper into the details, or maybe find websites that you weren’t able to write down, go to truthsofterasem.wordpress.com.  And don’t forget, Terasem has a priority list; those who join earlier are most likely to make the jump to cyberspace sooner.  The longer you wait, the longer the line will get!

(Linda)  If you’ve been enjoying the music that we use on this podcast series, which runs full length at the end of each podcast, it’s called Earthseed.  It’s the Terasem Anthem written by Martine Rothblatt, who also plays the flute and the keyboard.  If you’d like to experience that music in a video, with spectacular inspiring artwork, go to the Join! tab on the terasemfaith.net website.

(Fred)  Join us, and our quest for an endless future…

(Linda)  Come with us – into Tomorrow!

Closing music – no fade – full length.

Posted October 18, 2011 by Truths of Terasem - Podcasts in Uncategorized

Podcast No. 67 Posted 10/03/2011   Leave a comment

Podcast No. 67 Posted 10/03/2011

Download Directly or Listen via CyBeRev at:

http://www.cyberev.org/rss/podcasts/podcast.xml

Music  – “Earthseed” fades out, as the voice recording begins.

TITLE:  Truths of Terasem – The Why of Terasem  5.6 – 5.6.6

SUB TITLE:  Interpreting the Terasem Vision in Terms of Religious Parallels

SUMMARY:  Terasem began with the vision that the love of two persons could go on forever.  For this to be reasonable, it seemed that a society would have to emerge, transcending current limitations of humankind, where a state of “joyful immortality” would exist.  This was conceived to be the outcome of successfully surviving a technological “Singularity”, but many aspects were so far reaching that only religious parallels seemed appropriate in describing them.

(Fred)  Hi, we’re Fred & Linda Chamberlain, with podcast number 67 on the Truths of Terasem.

(Linda)  Today we start with 5.6, the vision of Terasem, and next week we move to the ultimate outcome that could spring from it.

(Fred)  For those who might not have read the synopsis prior to listening to today’s podcast, it reads, “Terasem began with the vision that the love of two persons could go on forever.  For this to be reasonable, it seemed that a society would have to emerge, transcending current limitations of humankind, where a state of “joyful immortality” would exist.  This was conceived to be the outcome of successfully surviving a technological “Singularity”, but many aspects were so far reaching and vast that only religious parallels seemed appropriate in describing them.”

(Linda)  One thing that really strikes me about this expansion is the use of unfamiliar words.  They’re from various non-English languages, but they fit together in such a harmonious way.

(Fred)  That’s right.  It’s a premonition of what a great thing it will be once we’re able to experience the cultural history of Earth from within cyberspace, with a full fluency of all its languages.  It will expand our way of expressing things enormously, and that will be just the beginning of what we’ll do with language when we have virtually perfect, unlimited memories.

(Linda) The Truths of Terasem themselves give us brief glimpses of some of these words but we’ll combine these with the definitions accessible on the Internet, and you’ll see how wide the potential implications are.  For example, there’s the term Hozh’q, which Terasem describes in 6.6.1 as “the conscious mind’s vision of a beautiful life, entails goodness, order, vitality, happiness and harmony.”  Yet, an online source says that it means:

“Hozh’q (from the Navajo language)  means ‘the beauty of life, as seen and created by the person’.  For the Navajo, this is something that grows from a human being and spreads outward to permeate the universe.

(Fred) Well, “grows from a human being and spreads outward to permeate the universe” and the fact that the idea is of Navajo origin adds a lot to it, for me.

(Linda) Having at least a look at this one term’s interpretation from both the Truths of Terasem themselves and online sources, let’s plunge directly into the elements of this Expansion.  5.6 tells us: “Visions of Terasem sprang from one person’s Hozh’q to become universal Alam al-mithral.”  Knowing that Hozh’q means, in terms of both our sources of interpretation, the conscious mind’s vision of a beautiful life, we’re still left with explaining the last part of it, which is that it becomes universal Alam al-mithral.

(Fred) Other areas of the Truths of Terasem use the term Alam al-mithral in ways that relate to both personal commitment and inspiration. 6.4.6 relates it to being accountable for our actions and inactions, embracing diversity in our community and our lives, respecting the autonomy of all consciousness, talking openly about issues and concerns, helping others to help themselves, always being open to new ideas, and focusing on strength, health, and happiness as foundations of mindset.

(Linda) Now, we can put this all together to tie in personal responsibility for one’s actions and lifestyle to a cosmic vision of destiny.  5.6 tells us that this is what happens when “the conscious mind’s vision of a beautiful life with goodness, order, vitality, happiness and harmony” comes to grips with what’s required in terms of one’s practice of life on the day to day level.  That can then be extended to what one might think of as one’s ultimate destiny.  And, we’re only at the beginning of looking at the six underlying elements of this expansion.

(Fred) In the first of these, 5.6.1, we find, “Sharing Hozh’q, the beauty of life as seen and created by a person, is the goal.”  This indicates that the vision of Terasem came from an individual person.  And it’s important to note that there is a goal, and the goal is to share that vision.

(Linda) In 5.6.2, this is expanded to, “Propagating hozh’q is the purpose of Terasem obligation to author self.”  Once we grasp a vision of this kind, making it a key part of our mindfiles becomes a duty.  We can tell this from the content of 1.8.6, which states, “Authoring-self recreates one’s mannerisms, personality, recollections, feelings, beliefs, attitudes and values, until Turing-equivalence is achieved.”

(Fred) That’s mindfiles for you!  The obligation is to make the foundation of one’s personality, prior to uploading, a positive outlook and mindset.  In other words, the goal is to carry as little evolutionary “mean-streak” baggage as possible with us into cyberspace.

(Linda) In 5.6.3, we find: “Reve a deux of a soul-mated pair nurtured the original Hozh’q toward Alam al-mithral.”  Without belaboring the translation, this can be expressed in English by saying, “The dream shared by two, a soul-mated pair, nurtured the original vision of “a beautiful life” to the expanded idea that to make this happen, it was going to take a transformation or transcendence of mindset and lifestyle, and a vision of a destiny that was cosmological in nature.

(Fred)  And, 5.6.4 says: “Alam al-mithral emerges as the world where the shared vision of Terasem becomes the shared reality.”  Clearly, a shared reality, as I read it here, means a shared sense of destiny, going beyond a limited set of commitments to personal transcendence and reference to inspiration by means of a cosmic perspective.

(Linda) In 5.6.5 we find, “Neuralspace will reach out from Alam al-mithral to encompass the multiverse.”  Perhaps this means that beyond the physical and sociological attributes of Alam al-mithral, lies the emergence of such a highly interconnected network of minds that all of them experience the presence of the others as if they were intertwined neurons of a quasi-infinite being, independent and uniquely diverse.

(Fred) And at the same time so in touch with the others that it would be as if a giant orchestra were playing with no need of a conductor with a baton in hand glancing feverishly at the score of music they all were playing.  Instead, the music would be what it was, as a consequence of all who contributed to it, without any such necessity for hierarchical administration.

(Linda) Finally for this Expansion, in 5.6.6 we have, “Great jugenspace, the conjunction of all neuralspaces, shall be the reality that nurtures our joyful immortality.”  In this case, the term “jugenspace”, spelled with a “J”, corresponds closely to another term found elsewhere in the Truths, “Yugenspace”, with a “Y” which 3.5 describes as, “the ultra-immense conglomeration of intersecting emulated realities that constitutes the future reality of Terasem.”  Perhaps the term is just spelled differently in different languages.

(Fred) Or, perhaps these two terms are not intended to refer to exactly the same thing, but both of them use the term reality or realities in such a way as to encourage us to expect them to be about the same.  We’ll take it to mean that as the entire universe becomes emulated and principally comprised of substrate for consciousness, the “conjunction of all neuralspaces” would refer to that collective consciousness itself, without necessarily specifying the particulars of all the substrates on which it existed.

(Linda)  All that makes me want to talk a little more about “love that lasts forever”.  What might compel us to unite with others in a true “collective consciousness”?   And what might be the most fundamental “core molecular structure” of such a collective consciousness?  Does “love” play a part in this?  Is love, perhaps, the “glue” that might hold it all together?

(Fred) You’re right.  It’s too important to skip over, and some background is needed. The carbon atom is an interesting example of an intact unit that has potential tremendous strength of external bonding.  Internally, it is of course a six-proton atom, meaning six positive electrical charges, supporting two electrons in the innermost electron shell and four in the next one out.  It’s very unlikely to be split, except by some extraordinarily powerful nuclear impact, and externally, it can bond to four others of its own kind and form the diamond lattice, which among natural molecular forms is the most indestructible periodic crystal we know of.

(Linda)  The other part of this example is Helium, with two protons.   We’ve discussed how Helium is one of the most independent, that is non-binding, of atoms.  Its two internal protons are like the two minds of a very closely mind-linked couple, whirling in an internal dialogue that makes them seem very isolated, distant, but in combination with other couples like themselves, might they not be able to very strongly bond, in the way that Terasem describes as c-cubes?  Three Helium atoms do, in fact, combine to form carbon, in the so-called “Triple-Alpha Process” of ‘carbon stars’.  Is that how “love” might come into it?

(Fred)  I think so, Linda.  Let’s imagine a couple so tightly bonded, like two “protons” locked together in an embrace, that it seems as if they might go on “forever”; soul-mates  committed to a kind of nuclear “collective consciousness”.  Such a couple might choose oblivion over separation, the sense that absolute death would be preferable to being torn apart.  Yet, if bonded to others of their own kind, along the lines Terasem suggests in its c-cube / c-quad type network, then these groups might have the potential, like carbon atoms, for not only being relatively indestructible, but linking further outward.

(Linda) So, couples like that might have, if strongly enough bonded internally, what it takes to be part of a “diamond” forming group of c-cubes.  In partnership with other similar groups of couples, they could “branch out”, leading to a network in which individual differences, diversities of the various couples, could make them like an aperiodic crystal, capable of networking outward endlessly?

(Fred)  Yes.  Taking the broadest view, one might say that setting aside the usual artifacts of biological evolution, the gender-gaps of the Mars-Venus paradigm where men and women are drawn to each other and yet doomed to be part of Mother Nature’s plan of natural selection, any two people strongly bonded internally like Helium atoms could link with other such mind-pairs to form elemental “carbon-atoms” of human networking as suggested by Terasem’s c-cubes, and then link outward from there.

Naturally, we’d expect them to be united by principles held in common like Geoethical Nanotechnology and embody Terasem’s levels of consciousness as defined by logical ethics and compassion.

(Linda)  That sounds reasonable, and so substituting mind-bonding for strictly gender-based attraction, which would embrace all kinds of transgenderism, the ‘love based’ couples could even be pledged to other couples’ survival within their ‘carbon-atom’ c-cubes in a LifePact way, reaching out to other c-cubes and producing a kind of aperiodic societal crystal that could hang together and expand into the cosmos.

(Fred)  One thing that worries me, Linda, is the focus on couples.  Where would individuals fit in?  Aren’t they going to be part of this network too?

(Linda)  Of course!  It’s more a matter of mind-state and mind-set, than the necessity to be a couple.  Some people, both women and men, have such active minds that they are continually locked into “internal conversations” within their own brains, or rather, minds.  They also have the integrity to question their own conclusions, to challenge their own thinking, you might say, in the style that you described so well in that thing you wrote back in 1970, “Two Minds”.  In effect, people like this are already living a Two Minds existence within themselves!   They’ll do just fine, in such a network !

(Fred)  From other models of this kind, not restricted to a relatively simple helium-carbon paradigm such as we have envisioned, it then seems likely that Terasem’s future community, in which unity and diversity are both needed, could evolve in a stable way, at the root of which could be a great deal of what might be “love intended to go on forever”.  Individuals who have an internal “Two Minds” character like you described can certainly be a part of this!

(Linda)  Right, Fred, and next week we’ll see a magical transformation.  We’ll look at how what we’ve been talking about today is a glove-fit for what most conventional religions mean by “God”.  You and I, who started out as staunch, Objectivist atheists 40 years ago, certain that nothing like God existed, had no inkling that now we’d be exploring the idea that with the exponential expansion of a survivable cybercivilization outward into the universe, something like a God might emerge, and that the seeds of that might already be taking shape in the Transhumanist community.

(Fred)  I guess we ought to be an acid-test illustration of how this kind of thing might seem to make sense, but when you look at just the outline of that, it’s a wild blending of concepts.  If someone asked you to describe “God” to them and you replied, as the Truths of Terasem might, “It’s simply going to be an evolutionary outcome of exponential infotechnology based on the development of nanotechnology, which in turn depends on collective insistence upon Geoethics.”

(Linda) I’ll wager that they might reply “That doesn’t sound like anything I’ve heard talked about in Church, to date!”

(Fred) And you’d have to reply, “Everything is changing as we get closer to the Singularity, and the curvature of space is even beginning to become visible!”

(Linda)  I’ve never had so much fun with ideas before.  Is that why this is called “joyful immortality”?

(Fred) Well, never-ending adventure in ideas is certainly the root of it.   Join Terasem” at terasemfaith.net if you want to “surf the Singularity” with us.  Terasem is presently, and will remain, very much like a “family”.  It’s structured so that no matter how widespread it gets, in the end it will remain a network of small, comfortable groups, where individuality and diversity are given the greatest respect.

(Linda)  Joining Terasem is easy and costs nothing, as explained at terasemfaith.net. You can review all of the Truths of Terasem online at terasemweb.org or terasemfaith.net.

(Fred)  If what you find here fascinates you as much as it does the rest of us who are involved with Terasem, you can start setting up your own mindfiles right away, through either CyBeRev.org or LifeNaut.com.  And you can create your personal history or autobiography, to be uploaded to CyBeRev.org by using the LifePact interview form.  Go to Terasemfaith.net and go to Mindfile Building, about half way down the page.  There are no fees for building or storing your mindfile.

(Linda) If you want to create a BioFile by preserving your DNA, you can do that too, very inexpensively at LifeNaut.com.  And if you want to preserve your brain or your whole body through cryostasis, check out both alcor.org and cryonics.org.

(Fred)  For those of you who love games, Mike Clancy, at Terasem, has created the new mindfile building game for the Android. It’s like a maze.  It’s very fast paced and it is addictive.  Check it out on PersonalityMD.com.

(Linda) And I’d like to invite everyone to discover, if you haven’t already, my favorite blog:  mindclones.blogspot.com.  Martine Rothblatt will treat you to fascinating discussions about mindclones, mindfiles and mindware that will take you far, far beyond what we are able to just sample lightly in these podcasts.  And you can find the text version of these podcasts at truthsofterasem.wordpress.com.

(Fred)  If you’ve been enjoying the music that we use on this podcast series, it’s called Earthseed.  It’s the Terasem Anthem.  It was written by Martine Rothblatt, who also plays the flute and the keyboard.  If you’d like to experience that music in a video, with spectacular astronomical artwork, go to the Join! tab on the terasemfaith.net website.

(Linda)  Join us, and our quest for an endless future…

(Fred)  Come with us – into Tomorrow!

 

Closing music – no fade – full length.

Posted October 4, 2011 by Truths of Terasem - Podcasts in Uncategorized